My Peru - A Guide to the Culture and Traditions of the Andean Communities of Peru

A Guide to the Culture and Traditions of the Andean Communities of Peru

 

introduction

responsible tourism

my community

maps

homestay

handicrafts

traditional clothing

traditional dances

fiestas & festivals

education

rituals & beliefs

natural medicines

agricultural calendar

gallery

my photos

my drawings

my stories

local ngo's

Traditional Dances in Peru

 

Chujchu or Chukchu

Chujchu - dances of Peru, Peru traditional dances

A comical dance in which the dancers represent labourers who, during the Colonial era, went to the tropical valleys and jungle regions to find work on the sugar plantations and returned with malaria and yellow fever!! The dancers often fall to the ground in violent convulsions and are "treated" by doctors and nurses who carry various medical instruments such as giant syringes and irrigators!  

 

>> More photos of the dance

    

Qhapaq Ch'unchu / Kapac Chunchu / Capac Chunchu

Qhapaq Chunchu - dances of Peru, Peru traditional dances

These dancers represent native warriors from the Qosņipata jungle who have sworn loyalty to the Virgin and protect her as she is carried around the streets during the fiesta. They wear mesh masks and a brightly coloured headband adorned with jewels and feathers from jungle birds. They wear kilts (unkus) and carry a spear made from native chonta wood. The dancers are often accompanied by a monkey character (kusillo) who entertains the crowds.

 

>> More photos of the dance

    

Qhapaq Qolla / Capac Qolla / Kapac Qolla

Qhapaq Qolla  - dances of Peru, Peru traditional dances

This dance represents the legendary merchants from the altiplano (Lake Titicaca) who used to bring products to trade or exchange for products from the Paucartambo and jungle regions. Prior to the arrival of the Spanish llamas were used to transport goods. After the conquest  mules were more commonly used. The dancers wear a knitted woollen masks called a "waq'ollo" and a beautifully adorned square flat hat called an "aqarapi" which usually has antique coins hanging from its borders. From their backs hang a dried vicuņa (q'epi) and as they dance they can be seen twisting strands of wool into thread. The Qhapaq Qollas also sing tender songs to the Virgin to demonstrate their devotion. The characters of the dance are the Mayor (El Alcalde) who carries a large wooden staff of authority, his wife (La Imilla) and child (q'ollita), two captains (one for each column) and a llama herder (llamero) who occasionally wanders off into the crowd follwed by his llama laden with products.

 

>> More photos of the dance

     

Qhapaq Negro / Kapac Negro / Capac Negro

Qhapaq Negro - traditional dances of Peru, Peru dances

 This dance represents the black slaves of the colonial and republican eras, who were brought from Africa to work in the mines and sugar plantations. Now liberated, they sing and dance and declare themselves slaves only to the Virgen herself. The dancers wear black plaster masks with sad expressions and exaggerated features. They have hats adorned with sequins, breastplates and a chain around their waist representing their former slavery. They also wear colourful silk scarves and carry a small wooden staff in the form of a clenched fist (called a "Maqui"). The dance leader is known as the Black King (Rey Negro). He carries a wooden rattle in his hand which he uses to keep the dancers in step.

 

>> More photos of the dance

   

Contradanza

Contradanza - traditional dances of Peru, Peru dances

 

 

 

>> More photos of the dance

   

Danzaq

Danzaq  - traditional dances of Peru, Peru dances

 

 

 

>> More photos of the dance

   

K'Achampa / Kachampa

K'Achampa / Kachampa - traditional dances of Peru, Peru dances

 

 

 

>> More photos of the dance

    

Majeņo

Majeno / Majeņo - traditional dances of Peru, Peru dances

In the past the region of Paucartambo did not produce spirits made from sugar cane (aguardiente). Instead they imported the alcohol from the Majes River Valley near Arequipa. The merchants brought the product by mule trains across the high Andes. The Majeņo dancers represent these merchants, dressed in leather jackets, scarves, riding breeches, spurred boots and with a bottle of beer or spirit in hand. The dance leader is known as the Old Majeņo  (Corporal) who dances with his elegant wife (la dama) who wears a pretty dress and carries a colourful parasol.

 

>> More photos of the dance

         

Qoyacha

Qochacha - traditional dances of Peru, Peru dances

 

 

 

>> More photos of the dance

     

Ch'unchacha

Ch'unchacha / Chunchacha - traditional dances of Peru, Peru dances

 

 

 

>> More photos of the dance

         

Saqra

Saqra - traditional dances of Peru, Peru dances

 

 

 

>> More photos of the dance

 

       

Doctores 0 Sijlla Wayra

Doctores / Sijlla Wayra - traditional dances of Peru, Peru dances

 

 

 

>> More photos of the dance

      

Auqa Chileno / Chileno

Auqa Chileno - traditional dances of Peru, Peru dances

 

 

 

>> More photos of the dance

 

   

Waka Waka / Waca Waca / Waca Pucllay

 

 

 

 

>> More photos of the dance

     

Panaderos

 

 

 

>> More photos of the dance

 

Maqtas

Maqtas - traditional dances of Peru, Peru dances

 

 

 

>> More photos of the dance

   

Paucartambus

Paucartambus - traditional dances of Peru, Peru dances

 

 

 

>> More photos of the dance

   

Wallata

 Fiesta of Reyes Magos (3 Kings) at Ollantaytambo, Cusco, Peru 06 January 2006

 

 

>> More photos of the dance

 

 

    

     

  

Introduction / Responsible Tourism in Peru / My Community / Maps of Peru / Andean Homestay Programme / Peruvian Handicrafts / Traditional Clothing in Peru / Traditional Dances of Peru / Fiestas and Festivals of Peru / Peruvian Education / Rituals, Beliefs and Customs in Peru / Natural Medicines in Peru / Agriculture in Peru / Peru Photo Gallery / My Photos / Drawings by Peruvian Children / Stories of Peru / Local Non-Government Organisations NGOs / Links / Site Map

 

Copyright Mike Weston 2007. All Rights Reserved. Website sponsored by Peru Treks  Website designed by Andean Vision